Thursday, March 4, 2021

She Beat Cancer at 10. Now She’ll Join SpaceX’s First Private Trip to Orbit.

Must Read

BBC Apologizes for Interview With Cory Booker Impostor

When the interview aired last week, several listeners tweeted their concerns about the show, featuring the impostor discussing...

Amazon Expands in N.Y.C. as Pandemic Sends Shoppers Online

New York has about 128 million square feet of industrial space, far less than many smaller cities. Indianapolis,...

Republicans Won Blue-Collar Votes. They’re Not Offering Much in Return.

Some Republicans have sought to address the strategic problem. Senator Mitt Romney of Utah put forward one of...


Her mom did not object.

Ms. Arceneaux walked into St. Jude for the first time in 2002. She was 10. Not long before, she had earned her black belt in taekwondo, but she was complaining of pain in her leg. Her mother saw a bump protruding over the left knee. The pediatrician in the small town of St. Francisville, La., where they lived, not far from Baton Rouge, told them that it looked like a cancerous tumor.

“We all fell apart,” Ms. Arceneaux said. “I remember just being so scared because at age 10, everyone I had known with cancer had died.”

At St. Jude, doctors provided the good news that the cancer had not spread to other parts of her body. Ms. Arceneaux went through chemotherapy, an operation to install the prosthetic leg bones and long sessions of physical therapy.

Even at that young age, bald from chemotherapy, Ms. Arceneaux was helping at fund-raisers for St. Jude. The next year, Louisiana Public Broadcasting honored her with one of its Young Heroes awards.

“When I grow up, I want to be a nurse at St. Jude,” she said in a video shown at the ceremony in 2003. “I want to be a mentor to patients. When they come in, I’ll say, ‘I had that when I was little, and I’m doing good.’”

Last year, Ms. Arceneaux was hired by St. Jude. She works with children with leukemia and lymphoma, such as a teenage boy she talked with recently.

“I shared with him that I also lost my hair,” Ms. Arceneaux said. “I told him: ‘You can ask me anything. I’m a former patient. I’ll tell you the truth, anything you want to know.’ And he said, ‘Will you really tell me the truth?’ And I said yes.”



Source link

- Advertisement -

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

- Advertisement -

Latest News

BBC Apologizes for Interview With Cory Booker Impostor

When the interview aired last week, several listeners tweeted their concerns about the show, featuring the impostor discussing...

Amazon Expands in N.Y.C. as Pandemic Sends Shoppers Online

New York has about 128 million square feet of industrial space, far less than many smaller cities. Indianapolis, whose population is just one-tenth...

Republicans Won Blue-Collar Votes. They’re Not Offering Much in Return.

Some Republicans have sought to address the strategic problem. Senator Mitt Romney of Utah put forward one of the most ambitious G.O.P. initiatives...

Colleges That Require Coronavirus Screening Tech Struggle to Say Whether It Works

By the end of the semester, however, only about one-third of the 1,200 students on campus were scanning the bar codes. Ethan Child,...

Justice Dept. Backs Away From Trump Era but Is Still Expected to Test Garland

Justice Department employees expressed hope that Judge Garland’s reputation for fairness and integrity would help mitigate some of those accusations. He is also...
- Advertisement -

More Articles Like This

- Advertisement -